Education Week at the Capitol Continues

Senators Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of University of Hawaii Community Colleges Education


Senators were spotted today in the Capitol rotunda and lanai participating in the Education Week’s University of Hawaii Community College Day in celebration of its 50th anniversary.

The events of the day opened with remarks from Sen. Jill Tokuda, chair of the Education Committee, UH Interim President David Lassner and community college chancellors.


Senator Tokuda gives opening remarks on Community College Day during Education Week


Guests at the opening ceremony of Community College Day at the State Capitol

Throughout the day, hands-on displays and demonstrations were put on by community college students showcasing robotics, solar cars, welding, art, food and fashion among others.


Senator Ige gets his blood pressure checked by students


Students from Honolulu Community College put on a fashion show


Senator Kidani tests a motorcycle simulator from Leeward Community College


Windward Community College students sketch portraits

UH Interim President David Lassner and community college chancellor were also honored in a special presentation on the senate floor.


Senators with the University of Hawaii’s interim president and chancellors

This day is one of many this week that highlights the importance and value of education in Hawaii and brings awareness to the quality education Hawaii community colleges offer.

Art at the Capitol 2013: What’s on Your Wall, Senator Brian Taniguchi?

For the 3rd year in a row, the Hawaii State Legislature is kicking off Art at the Capitol with a video web series entitled, “What’s on your wall?” In the days leading up to Art at the Capitol, this series will take the public behind the scenes of the Capitol to speak with legislators about art in their office.
In this particular episode, Senator Brian Taniguchi (District 11- Manoa, Makiki, Punchbowl, Papakolea ) shares one of his favorite art pieces, a wood with burnished drawing by Satoru Abe, which is displayed in his office. Abe was inspired by the materials he used to make woodcut prints and selected a simple rectangular blocks of wood for the sculpture’s principal shape. The public will be able to view this piece and other art work on April 5, 2013 at the 5th Annual Art at the Capitol from 4:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Abe is this year’s featured artist.
Click here to view video.

You can view more installments of “What’s on your wall?” online at: http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtatTheCapitolHI?feature=watch.

Hawai‘i State Legislature’s “Art at the Capitol” Marks 5th Anniversary

The Hawai‘i State Legislature will open its doors for the 5th Annual “Art at the Capitol” in conjunction with the Hawaii State Art Museum’s First Friday festivities on Friday, April 5, 2013 from 4:30 to 7 p.m.  A program on the third floor kicks off the event.

This is a unique opportunity for the public to view over 460 works of art by local artists placed in the offices of legislators and executive offices.  Forty-eight offices in both the House and the Senate, including the Public Access Room, and Office of the Governor are participating.

“Our State Capitol is like the Louvre in Paris, where we house a vast collection of art in a variety of mediums.  We are fortunate to have these amazing works of art in our offices and we wanted to make it more convenient for people to come and see them all at once to get the full impact of the collection,” said Senator Brian Taniguchi, who has led efforts for the Art at the Capitol event.

Along with viewing the art collection, visitors may watch a short documentary featuring renowned artist Satoru Abe.  He is known for his paintings and sculptures of abstracted natural forms, many of which resemble trees.

“I am thrilled that Satoru Abe will be our featured artist this year,” said Rep. Della Au Belatti who co-coordinates efforts from the House for Art at the Capitol. “He is the last surviving member of the Metcalf Chateau, the art enclave on Metcalf Street of seven young Asian American artists that included Tadashi Sato, who created the Aquarius mosaic in our Capitol rotunda. Now in his late eighties, he still works in his outdoor studio at home, creating sculptures during the day and painting at night. He’s truly amazing.”

Guests will enjoy entertainment featuring live chamber music from the Hawaii Youth Symphony Quartet #1 and #2, and have the chance to mingle with lawmakers and artists.  Satoru Abe, Carol Ann Davis, Boris Huang, John Tanji Koga and Rochelle Lum are among the artists who plan to attend.

“Art at the Capitol is a festive event,” said Rep. Mark Nakashima who coordinates efforts from the House for Art at the Capitol. “The people are invited into their Capitol to visit the offices, chat with legislators, and learn a little more about the personality of the occupant through the art they chose to display.  People can wander the halls listening to live chamber music and later stroll over to downtown Honolulu and celebrate First Friday activities.”

For a preview of some of the art in the offices, a video series, called “Art at the Capitol 2013: What’s on your wall?” can be found on the Art at the Capitol YouTube and Facebook accounts.

New videos featuring a representative and senator talking about artwork from their office will be posted daily until the day of the event.

Art at the Capitol Background:

Art at the Capitol began 5 years ago as Senator Brian Taniguchi’s initiative to allow the public to view art acquired by the “Art in Public Places” program that are displayed in the State Capitol offices.  With more than 900 pieces of artwork in the Capitol, the idea was conceived following a conversation with a Hawaii State Art Museum docent about having legislators open their doors to the public to view the art collection – the people’s art.  During its inaugural year, the Senate opened its doors afterhours for the Art at the Capitol event.   With an overwhelming amount of positive response towards the event, the House of Representatives joined Art at the Capitol the following year.  In 2012, the Governor’s and Lieutenant Governor’s Offices participated in the event, making it the first time that all 5 floors of the State Capitol were open for Art at the Capitol.

Works of art are placed in public areas of the State Capitol as part of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ “Art in Public Places” program, which seeks to enhance the environmental quality of state public buildings and spaces for the enjoyment and enrichment of the public; cultivate the public’s awareness, understanding and appreciation of visual arts; contribute toward the development and recognition of a professional artistic community; and acquire, preserve, and display works of art expressive of the character of the Hawaiian Islands, the multicultural heritage of its people, and the various creative interests of its artists. The program was established in 1967, and was the first of its kind in the nation.

Below are photos of the artwork from the Art in Public Places Collection displayed at the Hawaii State Capitol that visitors will be able to view:

(“View from the Plane” by Katsumi Yamashiro, 1984, watercolor, collage (located in Rep. Della Au Belatti’s office) – Credit: State Foundation on Culture and the Arts)

(“The Three Not So Little Pigs & The Not So Big Not So Bad Wolf” by Jackie Lau Mild, 2007, ceramic-raku (located in Rep. Mark Nakashima’s office) - Credit: State Foundation on Culture and the Arts)

(“Isami” by Satoru Abe, 1988, oil on canvas (located in Sen. Brian Taniguchi’s office) - Credit: State Foundation on Culture and the Arts)

Senate Spotlight Featuring: Senator Brian Taniguchi

Senator Brian Taniguchi (Senate District 11- Manoa, Makiki, Punchbowl, Papakolea) talks about his goals for the 2013 Legislative Session. Chair of the Senate Committee on Higher Education, Senator Taniguchi discusses the committee’s priorities, including following up on the 2012 Senate Special Committee on Accountability’s investigative hearing and improving the University of Hawaii System. He also touches on building a “sense of place” for his community.

To view video: http://youtu.be/kcnIRqLKsSI.

Briefings to Discuss University of Hawaii Salaries and Tuition

Honolulu –  The Senate Committees on Ways and Means and Higher Education will be holding two joint informational briefings to discuss employee salaries and student tuition at the University of Hawaii (UH) system.  UH’s Board of Regents (BOR) has been requested to present at both briefings.

There are growing demands for state resources.  A better understanding of how the university uses its money will help determine how state funds are allocated,” said Senate Ways and Means Chair David Ige.

 

We’re hoping to gain insight on the University’s processes and possibly look for ways of doing things better,” said Higher Education Chair Brian Taniguchi.

The first informational briefing will be held on Friday, February 1 at 9 a.m. in the State Capitol’s room 211.  The BOR has been asked to present information on salaries and compensation inclusive of the following:

1. Policies and processes used to determine salaries;

2. Salaries of highly compensated positions;

3. Types of compensation and benefits awarded other than salary; and

4. Employee contract buyouts

The second informational briefing will be held on Tuesday, February 5 at 9 a.m., also in room 211.   The BOR has been asked to present information on tuition inclusive of the following:

1. Policies and processes used to set tuition;

2. Tuition schedules from 2006 to 2017;

3. Amounts of revenue the tuition increases from 2006 to 2017 have and will provide the university;

4. Policies and processes used to determine how to allocate and spend existing and incremental increases in tuition revenue; and

5. The use of tuition revenue increases received for the past 6 years and the projected use of expected increases under the current tuition escalation schedule

Hawaii and Hiroshima Prefecture Celebrate 15th Anniversary of Sister-State Relationship

(Senator Brian Taniguchi meets with the Governor of Hiroshima, Hidehiko Yuzaki.)

Honolulu- Senator Brian T. Taniguchi joined fellow sister-state delegates during the month of May to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the sister-state relationship between the State of Hawaii and Hiroshima Prefecture. Held in Hiroshima from May 29 to 31, 2012, the commemoration included an economic forum featuring the State of Hawaii Division of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, meetings for the U.S. Japan Council, a 15TH Anniversary Sister-State Celebration and a “Hawaii Day” promotion at the Mazda Zoom Zoom Stadium during a baseball game of the Hiroshima Carps.

(Senator Brian Taniguchi speaks at a business seminar in Hiroshima for the 15th anniversary of the sister-state relationship between the State of Hawaii and Hiroshima Prefecture.)

Hiroshima Prefecture and the State of Hawaii share innumerous ties spanning across more than 100 years. In the early years of the arrival of Japanese to Hawaii, many Japanese immigrants were from Hiroshima Prefecture.

Historically, the State of Hawaii and Hiroshima Prefecture are forever linked as World War II in the Pacific started with the unfortunate attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Oahu on December 7, 1941 and ended with the tragic bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945.

Fifteen years ago, on May 30, 1997, a sister-state relationship was formed to promote a friendship, cultural ties, and good will between the State of Hawaii and the Hiroshima Prefecture. Since then leaders of the two states have worked collaboratively to strengthen this sister-state bond through numerous educational, cultural, athletics, commercial exchanges and peace initiatives.

At the 15th Anniversary banquet, retired Senate President Norman Mizuguchi, who conceived the idea of creating a sister-state, was honored with a proclamation from Hiroshima Governor Hidehiko Yuzaki and Hiroshima Prefecture for initiating the sister-state relationship.

A possible “Hawaii” celebration to commemorate the 15th Anniversary of the Sister-State Relationship is being planned for late August 2012.

The myriad of historic ties that exist between the State of Hawaii and Hiroshima Prefecture have forged a special bond between our two states,” said Senator Taniguchi, vice chair of the Hiroshima Hawaii Sister-State Committee. “I am extremely honored to have had the opportunity to take part in this celebration and I look forward to our continued work together.”

Ask Your Senator 2012: Thanks for Asking…


During this year’s “Pizza and Policy” event held at the Hawaii State Capitol, a handful of student participants were among the first ever to submit questions for Education Week’s inaugural “Ask Your Senator” project. As part of the “Pizza and Policy” event, students had the opportunity to discuss the legislative process with their State Legislators.

A Roosevelt High School student posed the following question to the Senators, “This is personal to me because my mom is an elementary school teacher. Elementary schools have closed due to decrease in enrollment/ attendance. Is there anything being done in the Senate to prevent closure of the schools and if so, what?”

As part of his response to the student’s question, Senator Brian Taniguchi, an alumnus of Roosevelt High School, explained, “Part of the problem with closures of schools is that we have shift in population… Now certainly, closing schools, especially elementary schools, is a very traumatic situation. Because it is a decision by the Department…the legislature doesn’t really get involved with that decision. But, we can do things to try to help the situation.” Senator Taniguchi represents the 10th Senatorial District, encompassing Manoa, Mo’ili’ili, McCully, Makiki.

To view the video click here.

Art at the Capitol 2012: What’s on your wall, Senator Brian Taniguchi?


Senator Brian Taniguchi talks about his personal connection to one of his favorite art pieces, a photograph by Franco Salmoiraghi, which is displayed in his office. The piece is a black and white photo of a Waipio Valley resident, entitled “Ginji Araki, Waipio Valley Resident, Age 93.” The public will be able to view this piece and other works of art on March 2, 2012 at the 4th Annual Art at the Capitol from 5 – 7 p.m.

Click here to view video.

State Legislature to Host 4th Annual “Art At The Capitol” on March’s First Friday

YouTube Video Previews of some of the Artworks Posted Daily on the Art at the Capitol Facebook Page

HONOLULU – The Hawai‘i State Legislature will open its doors for March’s First Friday event with the 4th Annual “Art at the Capitol.”  This is a unique opportunity for the public to view over 460 works of art placed in the offices of legislators and executive offices. The event will be held on Friday, March 2, 2012 from 5 to 7 p.m., with a short program on the third floor to start at 4:45 p.m.

The works of art placed in the offices of the Hawaii State Capitol are a part of the State’s Art in Public Places Collection (APP). Attendees will be able to visit fifty-two offices in both the House and the Senate, including the Public Access Room. This year, the Offices of the Governor and the Lieutenant Governor are joining the event for the first time.

During the event, guests will enjoy entertainment featuring live chamber music by quartets from Punahou and Hawaii Youth Symphony, and be able to mingle with artists and lawmakers. Some of the artists in attendance will be Ron Ken, Laura Ruby, Lori Uyehara, Ruthadell Anderson and Darrell Orwig.

Two short films documenting the history behind the Aquarius mosaic, located in the rotunda, and the two wall tapestries hanging in the Senate and House Chambers, will be shown on the fourth floor.  Keiko Sato, Tadashi Sato’s sister, shares her perspective on the renowned artist’s journey to creating Aquarius.  Ruthadell Anderson, creator of the Senate and House tapestries, takes viewers back in time to when she and her team spent hundreds of hours weaving the pieces of art.

For a preview of some of the art in the offices, a video series called “Art at the Capitol 2012: What’s on your wall?” can be found on the Art at the Capitol YouTube and Facebook accounts. New videos featuring a lawmaker talking about artworks from their office will be posted daily until the day of the event. The YouTube link is http://www.youtube.com/artatthecapitolhi
, and the Facebook link is http://www.facebook.com/artatthecapitolhawaii.

Each year this event keeps getting bigger and better,” said Senator Brian Taniguchi, who has led efforts to open the Capitol on First Friday. “Our State Capitol is like the Louvre in Paris, where we house a vast collection of art in a variety of mediums.  We are lucky to be able to display these amazing works of art in our offices, and we wanted to make it more convenient for people to come in and see them all at once, to get the full impact of the collection.”

Life without art is to exist, with art is to live,” added Rep. Isaac Choy, who coordinates efforts on the House side to bring Art at the Capitol alive each year. “That’s my philosophy and the reason why I appreciate creativity and supporting our local artists. Imagine our state buildings without the ‘Art in Public Places Program’.  We wouldn’t have these amazing pieces that enhance our environment, perpetuate our history and culture, and bring to us greater appreciation for the islands.”

Works of art are placed in public areas of the State Capitol as part of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ “Art in Public Places” program, which seeks to enhance the environmental quality of state public buildings and spaces for the enjoyment and enrichment of the public; cultivate the public’s awareness, understanding and appreciation of visual arts; contribute toward the development and recognition of a professional artistic community; and acquire, preserve, and display works of art expressive of the character of the Hawaiian Islands, the multicultural heritage of its people, and the various creative interests of its artists. The program was established in 1967, and was the first program of its kind in the nation.

 

 

Supporting the Improvement of Arts Education in Our Schools

The Senate Concurrent Resolution 130 working group and members of the community met for a brainstorming session at the Academy Art Center at Linekona on Wednesday, September 21, 2011. Those invited to the meeting included members from the Academy Art Center at Linekona, the Department of Education, the Arts education community, the City & County of Honolulu, Neighborhood boards, and neighboring properties.

The working group hoped to gain input on a long range plan for the properties at the Art Center, which serves as an art resource center for teachers, and benefits the surrounding community .

The working group was formed out of Senate Concurrent Resolution 130, SD1, which was passed by the Legislature during this past 2011 Legislative Session. The resolution, sponsored by Senators Brain Taniguchi, Carol Fukunaga, and Suzanne Chun Oakland, requested the Department of Education (DOE) to establish a working group to consider using the buildings adjacent to the Academy Art Center at Linekona on Young Street as an art resource center for teachers.

“Art education provides the potential to foster creativity that exists in each and every one of our children,” said Senator Taniguchi. “This resolution is another example on how we are providing opportunities to strengthen our teachers’ professional training and development, which in turn, improves art education in our schools.”

The Senate Concurrent Resolution 130 working group includes:

Senator Brian Taniguchi (District 10)
Senator Carol Fukunaga (District 11)
Senator Brickwood Galuteria (District 12)
Representative Della Au Belatti (District 25)
Representative Karl Roads (District 27)
Councilmember Tulsi Gabbard (District 6)
Councilmember Ann Kobayashi (District 5)
Vince Hazen, Director (Academy Art Center at Linekona)
Duane Preble, Community Member Representative (Honolulu Academy of Art Trustee)
Charles Kagawa, Facilities Director (Office of School Facilitates and Support Services, DOE)
Katherine Sakuda, Administrator SL II (Curriculum and Instruction Branch, DOE)
Evan Tottori, Resource Teacher (APP-AIR Curriculum and Instruction Branch, DOE)
Bundit Kanisthakhon, Architect (Tadpole Studios)
© Copyright Hawai'i Senate Majority Caucus - Theme by Pexeto